Custom Security Training

Custom Security Training

Since 2008, EEDS has offered a series of courses focused on web and application development, security, and forensic.
We provide in-house, public, private, custom, workshops and seminars. Unlike a public program that has a set date, an in-house workshop can be scheduled at any time of the year if we have available dates. We work with you to design training units and courses of instruction that completely correspond with your requirements, objectives and strategic action plans. We take into account any special company or sector-specific features and situations that might apply to the participant target group in question. To obtain an in-house brochure or to schedule an in-house seminar, please contact us.

Ordinarily, our calendar stays booked about two months in advance and some of our courses includes:

Offensive Security

  • Web Application Penetration
  • Wireless Penetration Test
  • Advance Pivoting
  • Password Cracking
  • Engineering & Phishing Attacks
  • Covering Tracks
  • & Backdoors
  • Attacks

Offensive Security

  • Web Application Penetration
  • Wireless Penetration Test
  • Advance Pivoting
  • Password Cracking
  • Engineering & Phishing Attacks
  • Covering Tracks
  • & Backdoors
  • Attacks

 


 

Training details

Max Trainee


Duration

Special Offer

Available

Package 1

3000OMR

per course

5

5 Days

(4 hours/ day)

Package 2

5100OMR

per course

10

5 Days

(4 hours/ day)

Package 3

7200OMR

per course

15

5 Days

(4 hours/ day)

Package 4

8400OMR

per course

20

5 Days

(4 hours/ day)


 


 

Forensics Training

Today, being prepared to handle a computer security incident is a top priority for system administrators. As businesses increase their online presence and their dependency on information systems’ assets, the number of computer incidents has increased.

The Incident Response and Computer
course was created to train internal resources on how to respond to a computer security event. The course is offered at a client’s premise (if requested) and is designed to train both IT and non IT staff on gold-standard procedures required for handling Computer Misuse & Incident Response.

EEDS has an impressive list of clients and its goal is to maintain the highest levels of quality possible for its clients. The qualifications and credibility of EEDS’s training team is unsurpassed and includes some of the top security and digital forensics experts in the country. Associates are distinguished by their functional and technical expertise combined with their hands-on experience, thereby ensuring that clients receive the most effective and professional service.
 


 

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Warith Al Maawali
W. AL Maawali is the Founder and Chief Editor of Eagle Eye Digital Solutions from the Sultanate of Oman with over 20 years experience in Security and Digital Forensics. He is also the Founder of om77.net.
A penetration test, or the short form pentest, is an attack on a computer system with the intention of finding security weaknesses, potentially gaining access to it, its functionality and data.The process involves identifying the target systems and the goal, then reviewing the information available and undertaking available means to attain the goal. A penetration test target may be a white box (where all background and system information is provided) or black box (where only basic or no information is provided except the company name). A penetration test can help determine whether a system is vulnerable to attack, if the defences were sufficient and which defences (if any) were defeated in the penetration test.
Social engineering is a non-technical method of intrusion hackers use that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves tricking people into breaking normal security procedures. It is one of the greatest threats that organizations today encounter.
A rootkit is a type of software designed to hide the fact that an operating system has been compromised, sometimes by replacing vital executables. Rootkits allow viruses and malware to “hide in plain sight” by disguising as necessary files that your antivirus software will overlook. Rootkits themselves are not harmful; they are simply used to hide malware, bots and worms. Rootkits get their name from the Unix term for the primary administrator account called “root” and “kits,” which refer to the software pieces that implement the tool. To install a rootkit, an attacker must first gain access to the root account by using an exploit or obtaining the password by cracking it or social engineering. Rootkits were originally used in the early 1990’s and targeted UNIX operating systems. Today, rootkits are available for many other operating systems, including Windows. Because rootkits are activated before your operating system even boots up, they are very difficult to detect and therefore provide a powerful way for attackers to access and use the targeted computer without the owner’s notice. Due to the way rootkits are used and installed, they are notoriously difficult to remove. Rootkits today usually are not used to gain elevated access, but instead are used to mask malware payloads more effectively.
Trojan horse is a program in which malicious or harmful code is contained inside apparently harmless programming or data in such a way that it can get control and do its chosen form of damage, such as ruining the file allocation table on your hard disk. In one celebrated case, a Trojan horse was a program that was supposed to find and destroy computer viruses. A Trojan horse may be widely redistributed as part of a computer virus.
A packet sniffer is a utility that has been used since the original release of Ethernet. Packet sniffing allows individuals to capture data as it is transmitted over a network. Packet sniffer programs are commonly used by network professionals to help diagnose network issues and are also used by malicious users to capture unencrypted data like passwords and usernames in network traffic. Once this information is captured, the user can then gain access to the system or network.
A penetration test, or the short form pentest, is an attack on a computer system with the intention of finding security weaknesses, potentially gaining access to it, its functionality and data.The process involves identifying the target systems and the goal, then reviewing the information available and undertaking available means to attain the goal. A penetration test target may be a white box (where all background and system information is provided) or black box (where only basic or no information is provided except the company name). A penetration test can help determine whether a system is vulnerable to attack, if the defences were sufficient and which defences (if any) were defeated in the penetration test.
Social engineering is a non-technical method of intrusion hackers use that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves tricking people into breaking normal security procedures. It is one of the greatest threats that organizations today encounter.
A rootkit is a type of software designed to hide the fact that an operating system has been compromised, sometimes by replacing vital executables. Rootkits allow viruses and malware to “hide in plain sight” by disguising as necessary files that your antivirus software will overlook. Rootkits themselves are not harmful; they are simply used to hide malware, bots and worms. Rootkits get their name from the Unix term for the primary administrator account called “root” and “kits,” which refer to the software pieces that implement the tool. To install a rootkit, an attacker must first gain access to the root account by using an exploit or obtaining the password by cracking it or social engineering. Rootkits were originally used in the early 1990’s and targeted UNIX operating systems. Today, rootkits are available for many other operating systems, including Windows. Because rootkits are activated before your operating system even boots up, they are very difficult to detect and therefore provide a powerful way for attackers to access and use the targeted computer without the owner’s notice. Due to the way rootkits are used and installed, they are notoriously difficult to remove. Rootkits today usually are not used to gain elevated access, but instead are used to mask malware payloads more effectively.
Trojan horse is a program in which malicious or harmful code is contained inside apparently harmless programming or data in such a way that it can get control and do its chosen form of damage, such as ruining the file allocation table on your hard disk. In one celebrated case, a Trojan horse was a program that was supposed to find and destroy computer viruses. A Trojan horse may be widely redistributed as part of a computer virus.
A packet sniffer is a utility that has been used since the original release of Ethernet. Packet sniffing allows individuals to capture data as it is transmitted over a network. Packet sniffer programs are commonly used by network professionals to help diagnose network issues and are also used by malicious users to capture unencrypted data like passwords and usernames in network traffic. Once this information is captured, the user can then gain access to the system or network.
Digital forensics (sometimes known as digital forensic science) is a branch of forensic science encompassing the recovery and investigation of material found in digital devices, often in relation to computer crime.
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